Radio Diaries from the Great Lakes Logging & Heavy Equipment Expo 2019

In this episode, Northern Logger Editor Eileen Townsend takes a recorder around the annual Great Lake Logging & Heavy Equipment Expo in Escanaba, MI. She catches up with our northern correspondent Mike Monte, chats with a logging father and his son, a longtime logging yooper and Henry Schienebeck, the organizer behind the annual expo.

This episode is sponsored by John Deere.

Subscriptions, questions and comments can be addressed at eileen@northernlogger.com.

Production and music by E.T. Townsend

The Only Logger in the Woods: Logging Stories from New Jersey and Rhode Island

On this episode of The Northern Logger podcast, we spoke with loggers from the smallest northeastern states about how they make it work. These loggers work in areas where it is uncommon to see a log truck going down the road and where hardly anyone grows up working in the woods. We explore what it means to be a logger when there are no other loggers around.

We also spoke with the folks over at the Maine Logger Health and Safety Study — an important research project that looks into the health and safety of the forest products industry in Maine. This study has been going on for a few years now and they have results they were eager to tell us about.

You can read print versions of these stories by subscribing to our podcast at www.northernlogger.com.

Thanks for listening to The Northern Logger podcast!

(Reporting by Eileen Townsend. Production by Emily Townsend.)

A Day at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

We spent the day at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, speaking with two researchers -- Elizabeth Studer and Laurel Symes -- about their work at the historic site for forest research. We spoke with Studer and Symes about the future of the ash tree and what will happen when ash goes extinct, bioacoustics and birdsong, what “biogeochemistry” is, and the history of research forests.

Spruce Budworm Returns


The last big spruce budworm outbreak took place in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Those who worked in the forest industry in Maine during that period are no stranger to the words “spruce budworm.” During that outbreak, the budworm defoliated 20% of Maine’s spruce and fir forests, causing the timber industry to salvage log extensively. In Canada, the picture was even more dramatic; some areas of Novia Scotia saw 90% tree mortality. Clearcuts became commonplace.

Today, a spruce budworm outbreak is back in Canada and we are seeing the very beginnings of another outbreak in northern Maine. How has management changed since the last outbreak and what tools are available to landowners who hope to protect their forests against spruce budworm damage? We spoke to Brian Roth, of the University of Maine’s Cooperative Forestry Research Unit and the Maine Spruce Budworm Taskforce, Dr. Rob Johns of the Canadian Forest Service, Alison Kanoti of the the Maine Forest Service, and Aaron Weiskittel, the Director for the Center for Research on Sustainable Forests. Thanks to this month’s guests.


Learn more in this episode of the Northern Logger.

Thanks again to our episode sponsor John Deere.

Trucking with Tina

In this episode, our March cover girl, Tina Dyment, tells all from breaking into a man’s industry to advice for new or young truckers. Don’t miss this one!

Production by Emily Townsend

Music by Ben Sound